February 2017 Newsletter

Monthly Newsletter | February 2017
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A Note From Emily

 

Hi everyone,

Earlier this month, I was honored to participate in City Club of Portland's Friday Forum panel, talking about "Feminism at the Intersection." If you aren't familiar with the term, intersectionality describes how different forms of discrimination interact and overlap. The term was coined by legal scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989, and originally used to describe the compounding effects of racism and sexism experienced by Black women. 

For an Oregon where all women and girls thrive, all women and girls need to have equitable access to opportunity. But right now, many of Oregon’s women and girls of color do not. Because of the way race and gender intersect, women and girls of color face disproportionate barriers to success.

Four terrific panelists explored the topic of intersectional feminism during our recent "Eight That Can't Wait" discussion on systemic racism in Oregon. And while it will take public policies to fully tackle the systemic nature of the gender and racial inequities detailed in Count Her In, each of us can also make a difference. Find resources here.

With much gratitude,
Emily Evans
Executive Director, Women’s Foundation of Oregon

Stat of the Month

In 2017, the Multnomah County commissioners are all women, and a majority are women of color.

Call for Stories & Volunteers

Stories: Your story can help show Oregon's leaders why it's important to take action on the "Eight That Can't Wait" set of urgent issues facing Oregon's women and girls. Share your story with the Women's Foundation.

Volunteers: Our big Count Her In Celebration is right around the corner on March 2--it's sold out, and now we need volunteers to help make it a success! Sign up here.

Foundation Updates

Investment Update


We've just released the Count Her In Companion Briefs, "Promising Policies for a State That Can't Wait."

A few months ago, the Count Her In report laid out the startling challenges women and girls face in Oregon. This new set of companion briefs lays out potential solutions.

We worked with experts, advocates, and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to assemble a set of evidence-based and common sense policies that are already working elsewhere. In particular, these briefs address the “Eight That Can’t Wait" -- the set of profound inequities faced by Oregon’s women and girls.

As Oregon's 2017 legislative session gets underway, the urgency in Oregon couldn't be more clear, and the national context couldn't be more dire.

Our ultimate hope is that Oregon's leaders will ask themselves this simple question before every decision this session: Is this action good for all women and girls? 

Download the briefs here, and share on social media.

Member Spotlight


Name: Kimberly Paxton-Hagner
Age: 47
Occupation: Freelance Graphic Designer
Member of the Women's Foundation since: 2016

What’s your favorite spot in Oregon?
Anywhere I can see a sunset over the Cascade Mountains.

What quality do you most admire in others?
Kindness.

Which talent would you most like to have?
To sketch with accuracy whatever idea comes into my head.

What was your first volunteer experience?
Helping physically challenged children ride horses.

What’s the best place to eat in our great state?
Sunny Yoga Kitchen in Bend.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
Building deep, meaningful relationships with women in my community. We raise each other up, support each other’s creative work, and come together to do good in our town.

Which woman (living or dead) do you most admire?
Right now I am exploring the histories of influential African American women Fannie Lou Hamer, Dorothy Height, Sojourner Truth, Angela Davis, Claudette Colvin, and Lugenia Burns Hope. These amazing women all demanded more for themselves and others.

What’s your most treasured possession?
The ugly-as-can-be wild boar’s head that was in my grandfather’s office, then my dad’s office, and now in my office.

What is your personal motto?
“Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.” - Maya Angelou

What’s your idea of perfect happiness?
A warm day, a good book, snacks, kombucha, and knowing a fun event with friends is just around the corner.

What makes you laugh uncontrollably?
The silliest things, like when you are on a late night road trip with your best friend and she makes you giggle until you can’t breathe just because she can.

Why are you a member of the Women’s Foundation?
Women supporting women is the foundation upon which our communities build everything. We are the soul of our state. When we are well, we lift up everyone around us.

Thanks, Kim!
 

Make a Difference


Ask Oregon's leaders to use our Gender Lens for Policymakers when they make decisions this session. Opportunities to speak with lawmakers in-person include meetings across the state and Salem Lobby Days throughout February and March.

Community Events

Feb. 22: Rally for Survivors of Sexual and Domestic Violence, Salem
Join the advocates in support of services and protections for survivors of domestic and sexual violence.

March 2-5: Muse Conference, Bend
Brings together local women & teens with internationally recognized artists, authors, athletes, entrepreneurs, activists, and social change leaders to celebrate International Women’s Day.

March 2-19: Meet Me in the Dark, Portland
This all-female play looks at the relationships between two high schoolers and their mothers, with themes of friendship, betrayal, self-help, and poverty.

March 4-5: Muthaland One-Woman Show, Portland
Written and performed by Minita Gandhi. A young woman travels to India and unearths family secrets, encounters a prophet, and discovers her voice.

March 4-April 15: SURJ 1-on-1 Training, Corvallis
Have you done work related to racial justice, or do you want to learn to be an effective ally? Be part of this 6-week one-on-one training & mentorship.

March 8: "Eight That Can't Wait" Discussion: Gaps in Reproductive Health Access, Portland
Join the Women's Foundation for a community discussion on gaps in access to reproductive health care in Oregon and what can be done to address them.

Now through March 31Giving Back: The Soul of Philanthropy, Reframed and Exhibited, Portland
MRG Foundation presents stories of generosity among Americans of African descent.

If you would like your event added to our calendar, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Oregon News to Know

The Oregonian: Gender, Racial Inequities Need First Attentions by Oregon Leaders
Op-ed by Women's Foundation Executive Director, Emily Evans

Mother Jones: Oregon Just Showed States How to Fight Back Against the War on Women
"The Reproductive Health Equity Act is legislation that would ensure that all Oregonians, regardless of income, citizenship status, gender identity, or the type of insurance that they have, have the freedom to decide if and when they have children."

OPB: Oregon Bills Target Gender Wage Gap
"Two measures were introduced in the Oregon legislature aimed at making sure women are paid the same rate as men for similar work."

U.S. Department of Labor’s Women’s Bureau: Women’s Employment Rights Guide
Just out: this free downloadable e-book, a comprehensive resource on the federal employment rights available to all working women.

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